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20121109
20121109
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
but geographically over to egypt, because as you know, we went there. now we have a unique situation in israel that, as we've said, creates all kinds of fascinating but somewhat negative issues regarding ethics. egypt was a different story, because here, we have a predominantly muslim country. now you know, i'm sure you're well aware of that. in egypt- i mean, in israel, the political power is held by the jews; as we heard, the christians are a minority, even christian arabs, and they don't know what they're doing even with a partition. but in egypt, obviously, we have a muslim majority. now what happens here is we had a fascinating interview with reverend noor. we've already seen coptic christians that have for centuries well beyond the muslims, before the muslims enjoyed something of a, you know, left alone for the most part, allowed to exist. but we have protestant christians actually in egypt, and we had a chance to chat with reverend noor who heads up an evangelical protestant church there- a world renowned figure on the level of billy graham in that part of the country, and to hear his strugg
in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
but also in certain countries. look at northern africa and egypt, tunisia. they have studied these processes very intensely, and they know -- they have roughly 100,000 incidents of social unrest a year. >> what do we expect -- what are you expecting from the new leadership in terms of foreign policy? >> mostly a continuation of policies as we have seen the mayan past. china's major priority to stability in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have
spain, france, asia minor, north africa and egypt. transportation expert ross hassig. it was closer is terms of the cost of transportation to get to egypt than it was to get a hundred miles inland in italy. you couldn't bring food from a hundred miles inland to rome, because even with carts, even with oxen, it simply cost too much. so rome was able to tap into the production of other areas because it was able to use ships where the cost of transportation was extremely low. keach: but roman seagoing merchant ships carrying upwards of a thousand tons were too large to navigate the tiber river, so cargos were unloaded onto smaller vessels downriver at the port city of ostia. ostia was once a bustling commercial city, with shops and restaurants... villas and apartment houses for merchants and shippers... theaters, parks and enormous warehouses crammed with every possible commodity. archaeologist amanda claridge. it's clear that the merchants, the many, many thousands of people involved in the supply of the city of rome who did base themselves in ostia -- all the transient ships' captain
is much more active internationally across not just libya and egypt but also elsewhere and his network is involved in exporting terrorism all throughout the middle east. >> u.s. officials tell fox jamal established training camps in libya. some of these camps that linked the attack were trained. administration critics say the pool of suspects from libya, to your knowledge, egypt and even one from al qaeda and iraq is more evidence of premeditation and not a flash mob, shep. >> catherine herridge in washington. president obama said to become the first sitting u.s. president to visit the southeast asian president of burma. confirmed the historic trip. comes after civilian government took power in burma last year ending five decades of military rule. the white house says president obama will meet with the burmese president and opposition leader and that president obama hopes the visit will encourage burma's ongoing democratic transition. some human rights activists say that country's military is still a pressing ethnic and religious minorities. one group claims that reforms like freeing p
do. bill: here we have new protests break out in egypt. have a look at this. [chanting] bill: apparently these are ultraconservative muslims rallying demanding egypt's new constitution be placed on islamic law or sharia law. moderate -ts and liberals pier it could endanger civil liberty. this is after mubark's regime was taken out last year. martha: we are learning that there could be some big changes at the top of the cabinet level positions in washington. including possibly attorney general eric holder that told a group of students yesterday that he doesn't know if he will stay in his job. >> i have to really ask myself the question about, you know, do i think that there are things that i still want to do? do i have gas left in the tank? it's been an interesting and tough four years. so i just really don't know. i don't know at this point. martha: interesting and tough is a good way to describe what the last term has been like for eric holder. joined now by chris wallace ""fox news sunday"" good morning. >> good morning, martha. martha: it's atmosphere interesting for a pre
? >> bret: they demand egypt new constitution base on the ruling of islamic law. opponents want to structure the document on principles of shariah. but hardliners incyst it must abide by clerical interpretation. disagreements like that over words and phrases are not unusual in politics. syria's president insists the country is not engaged in zil war. instead, bashar assad tells russian tv he is fighting terrorism through proxxys. iran said it fired in predator drone after crossing to the u.s. air space. aircraft was 60 miles off dost when it was attacked. israel defense minister says iran slowed iranian enrichment timetable to push back the ability to make the nuclear weapons by eight months. the nuclear agency says it will meet with iranians officials next month to restart stalled negotiations. obama administration is dismissing the stories that long-time domestic policy advisor valerie jarret is rung point on evident to get iran back to the table. senior white house foreign affairs correspondent wendell goler reports. >> both the white house and the state department deny claims that presid
, no one, just the military. two overseas labs i know best are egypt and thailand. they have been around a long time. they were set up after world war ii in the early 1915s. why have they done so well? why are they looked upon as an asset by the country? it is because in those two situations, locals feel that they own part of the organization. if you go there to visit, you see a lot of the egyptians, they feel it is part of their infrastructure, belongs to them. that has been a tremendous excess in -- hiv vaccine could never have been done. miss embrey hit the nail on the head. the position is to make these work a little better between nih and the military because nih has come to recognize the military offers the ability to accomplish its mission. which is basically mixing and pouring in laboratories and knocked out where the rubber hits the road. patients accept certain areas like cancer research. you can't do research on malaria here. it might be changing. if you think about us as a nation, what is best for us in the future, we have built on that, and sentiment, the military labs hallw
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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